The hows of indie publishing

What’s the best way to self-publish?

Since starting this project at the beginning of August, I’ve been concentrating entirely on writing: the process and structure around creating a book. I’d assumed that when I’m finished writing, I’ll simply log into Amazon, upload my text, choose a publishing option and release it to Kindle. Job done!

This is one way of releasing a book, but having read a bit on the subject, I’m not convinced it is the best, or certainly not the only publishing route an indie author should take. If that’s the case, what is the best way then?

This post is a call for information. If you have written any posts around publishing or have experience or knowledge on the subject then please write me a note or send me a link to your blog. I’ve created a page on this blog (see Indie Publishing link above) to collate any information, either leave me a comment there or below on this post.

Thanks for any help you can give with this – I’ll resume my regular updates on the lost dabs project over the weekend as usual.

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Is there any value in posting your work in progress?

The critics

Writing a blog is about drip-feeding your thoughts to anyone who’ll listen in the world and getting immediate feedback on it. Seems to work well. Writing a book is all about the big bang. Landing an entire magnum opus on the reader and expecting them to devour it in one sitting, hopefully emerging full of praise on the other side.

So is there any middle ground? Is it worth getting the opinion of the community on some half-written text before the big release? Does any interim feedback simply serve as self-gratifying validation for the author, rather than gently steering them in the right direction?

I recently wrote a screenplay for an amateur animator friend. It was pretty intense work and included eight songs, all of which I recorded and posted on youtube for her. I sent over the first act and she liked it. Buoyed by this response I carried on with the screenplay and eventually completed it. It had taken about three months but had been a labour of love and a great writing experience.

After sending it over, it took my friend a while to go through it. When we finally caught up, it was a very different conversation. She picked the smallest holes throughout the plot and put up barriers to show why she couldn’t start planning the filming. I guess she didn’t really want to make it in the first place.

So I don’t like a critic, is that the problem? I guess I don’t mind a few general pointers, hints, even criticisms, as long as it’s constructive and not just negative for the sake of it. In my case, I’d written a three act script and eight songs which I was pretty proud of, but I don’t think my friend even listened to them. She just read the words in the script and moved on to where she thought the problems were. I wouldn’t mind, but I’m sure anyone could find just one tiny piece of positive to reflect the obvious effort I’d put in.

Publish as you go

I’ve been thinking about publishing some of my writing for the book on this blog as I go along. Mainly so that I can show a bit of a flavour of where it’s heading, but also to get some feedback on what I’ve done. Following my recent experience, I’m not sure if this is the best idea.

When I wrote the screenplay, I was writing on my own. I showed it to one other person and got their take on it. The other person had some different views to me so we ended in a stalemate – how I wanted to write the story versus how she wanted to animate it. It was my word against hers.

Now I am pitching to a bigger audience, is it a good idea to encourage feedback on work in progress? Does anyone have experience, either positive or negative with this? I am completely open to comments on anything I write, as long as it’s constructive. In fact, I am always hoping to enter into a discussion around everything I do, as long as it helps the learning and improving process.

One issue around reviewing someone else’s work is personal opinion. When I am reading other people’s work I try to be objective about it. I may not like the genre, but if the writing’s good then that’s the feedback to give. If the writing’s bad then I try to say what’s wrong with it and not let the subject matter influence me. This can be tricky but it’s the most important thing about writing – different people like to read different things. There’s a market for everything, and that’s why we do it.

My view is that I want to share as much as I can and encourage all comments and opinion from anyone with an interest. It’s then up to me how much I take on board and adapt my writing accordingly. The only issue is that too much influence from outside could put a strain on the timing of the project, but at least I won’t end up in a one-on-one stalemate like I had with my now defunct screenplay.

As always, I’d really like to hear any comments or thoughts you have on this, and will be happy to discuss them below.

An Introduction to the World of Indie Publishing

A Project Update

I put a countdown on my blog to keep my ever impending deadline in mind. However, after a couple of days I had to move it down the page so now it doesn’t appear on my laptop screen when I go onto my blog. No one needs to see their deadlines all the time.

So far, the Lost Dabs project is a mere 13 days old. So much has happened in the last couple of weeks of Foundations: I’ve decided on how the book will be published, the timescales for writing and editing, some of the characters details and an outline of the plot. I’ve created a method for capturing all my data around each character and the background facts of the world and developed a method for incrementally writing about each.

However, I’ve also learnt about something that I knew nothing of when I started. All I wanted to do was to publish a book myself using an established outlet. In my mind this was the Kindle Store – it seemed like the obvious choice as it has a large market share, the Amazon Store is something I already know about and, possibly most importantly, I already own a Kindle, an iPad with the Kindle App, an iPhone with the Kindle App… it’s all pretty accessible.

Doing It Yourself

But them I started reading about a whole world of Indie Authors. People who make a living doing what I’m trying to do. I realised that I am in massive danger of making light something that other people have spent years of their lives working on. I realised that I can’t produce any old crap and call myself an Indie Author. I realised I have to be a signed up member of the Indie movement.

This is the best news I’ve had since starting this project – the number of people who are all writing and independently publishing are all part of a great community. There’s massive competition in this market but I don’t want to see it. I want to embrace what other people are doing. I want to eschew the books I’ve bought on my shelves and start reading Indie Authors. I want to see what other people in my position are doing. I want to explore different genres and engage with people who are writing.

It’s the only way the Indie community can function: if I want people to read my book, I need to read and engage with those writing their own books.

As an unpublished Indie Author I don’t feel I can call myself fully part of this wonderful community yet, but I feel strongly enough to make it only a matter of time. Watch out world, the Huscin is coming! The countdown is ticking… maybe I should move it back to the top of my blog?!

How do you know when to stop?

The Definition of Done

Given a project with a limited timeframe, you can only do so much before you have to finish. That’s fine if you don’t care about the quality, but publishing a book to a world audience without careful vetting would be committing author suicide. So how do you get the most out of what you write without going over the deadline and without writing half a story?

I’ve discussed this at length in a previous post so I don’t want to talk about that again. Instead, I want to discuss the Definition of Done. When is something done? When it’s finished. Obvious. How about: when it’s finished to a predetermined level of quality? Better, perhaps.

I was cutting the grass today. It was only when I’d finished and put the lawnmower away I started noticing all the bits I’d missed – there were small patches of long grass everywhere. I was obviously too close to the grass when I was mowing to see where it was uneven. The grass is pretty much all one colour and it’s difficult to see the bits you’ve missed when you’re right on top of it. You only see the bigger picture when you step back and look at it with fresh eyes.

This got me thinking about writing and my dilemma over identifying something as done.

The finish

In order to get a quality product to a level of satisfaction, you need a cool down period, some time away from your immediate thoughts of it. In the case of the grass, this was going indoors and looking back at it from the window. In the case of writing it means forgetting everything you know about your text and reading it back through the eyes of a new reader. This is the most important step towards quality: disassociation. If you can forget why you wrote something, you can read it and make up your own mind about it. If you can forget all the meta writing and scaffolding you can look at it objectively.

I’ve decided to take steps towards this in my writing. I need to disconnect writing and editing as far as possible. Unfortunately, as this project is time constrained, this gap will not be as much as I’d like. I’m considering a two week closed book on everything written, continually revisiting the text written two weeks ago. This means that the first two weeks writing remains unedited until editing starts alongside with any new writing. The end effect is that I need to finish writing everything two weeks before I can expect it to be fully finished and edited.

It sounds like I just lost two weeks of writing at the end of the project, but if it means an improved product in the long run, I’m all up for it.

Do you have any experience or opinion on how to write a quality product given limited resource? Leave a comment below to discuss.

The Lost Dabs Project is alive!

The Lost Dabs Project

This week, I’ve launched a new project – namely to write a book and publish it in time for Christmas. It’s a study of whether this is even possible, what are the steps needed to achieve the goal, and what can be learnt about the writing and publishing process in general. The project is running from conception to shelf in five months, I haven’t even come up with a premise around the plot yet.

The Project has already hit its first Gateway, the feasibility of the project is complete. The outcomes of the feasibility phase were to create an outline plan and set up the relevant blog and twitter accounts. To be honest, this was a pretty easy part of the project as it took very little work to complete. Importantly though, I hit the deadline – to create the first communication with the outside world by 1st August.

The phases of the project in the outline plan are:

  1. Feasibility
  2. Foundations
  3. Production
  4. Release

I’m sure I’ll be talking a lot more about this in the weeks to come. Right now, we’re in Foundations which will involve doing all the background work before beginning writing.

The Blog

I’ve set up this blog as a place for discussion around the different aspects of writing and publishing a book. I’m hoping to generate a lot of ideas from the community and to support other writers with my experience as I go along.

Feel free to comment on anything I’ve written about and I’ll happily add my thoughts. Hopefully we can develop a good insight into the best ways of creating inspiration, developing plots and characters and the technical side of publishing a book.

I just need to have a good idea for a story now.

Why Lost Dabs?

Your fingerprints are known as your dabs (mainly in the criminal world, I believe). Because the timescales for this project are so tight, it’s going to take a lot of typing to get it completed – I’m anticipating typing so fast that my fingerprints will get worn off, resulting in “lost dabs”!